Project Hope was established in 2005 in memory of Hope Perry Goldstein by her husband and two sons.  It grew out of her singular, selfless request to them during her illness: “do something to combat this dreadful illness, saving just one life will make the effort a success.” In response, Project Hope employs a disciplined strategic planning model that brings together recognized medical professionals, researchers and advocates to attack the problems of ovarian cancer.  

 

The mission of Project Hope is to reduce the incidence of ovarian cancer and improve outcomes for women treated for it as a result of research and education. Project Hope advances this mission by educating women and their families about their individual risk of ovarian cancer and the specific screening and risk-reducing measures appropriate for them. It supports research directed at early detection, prevention, and more effective treatments for the illness. 


 

About Project Hope

Hope Perry Goldstein was an educated, involved and vital woman. She grew up in New York City where she attended primary and secondary school and college.  She was a young, highly regarded, fast track executive at Sears, Roebuck & Company before leaving to raise her family.  Hope was an accomplished pianist and artist/crafts person.  She designed and fabricated gold jewelry after studying ancient Greek and Egyptian methods. She was a volunteer at The Costume Institute of The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, a member of The Women’s Board of The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and a Trustee of The Museum of Contemporary Art of Chicago, among other civic activities.

 

In a word, she was an AWARE person.  However, like most women, Hope was UNAWARE of the facts about the illness that took her life, ovarian cancer; its risks, symptoms, and risk-reducing options.  She was unaware of the information that may have been able to save her life. Project Hope seeks to eliminate that knowledge gap for others.

"Do something to combat this dreadful illness, 

saving just one life will make the effort a success."

© 2011 Foundation for Women’s Cancer and Project Hope for Ovarian Cancer Research and Education. All rights reserved.